APA Blog

Category : Anxiety

How Endometriosis, a Common, Painful Condition Many Women Face, Can Impact Mental Health

Endometriosis is a common, often painful condition in which the type of tissue that forms the lining of the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the uterus. The most common symptom of endometriosis is chronic pelvic pain, especially just before and during the menstrual period. Endometriosis is also associated with mental health conditions, including depression and anxiety, and a reduced quality of life.

Understanding Stimming:  Repetitive Behaviors with a Purpose

One key symptom of autism spectrum disorders is repetitive behaviors, such as repetitive actions like self-stimulation behavior, or stimming. These behaviors can involve one part of the body, the entire body or an object. While they may seem distractive or disruptive, and while it may not be obvious to others, stimming often serves a purpose for the individual. 

What Will Protect Health Care Workers’ Mental Health During the Pandemic? 

Health care workers have been on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic since March, many of them facing very difficult and stressful situations, such as long hours, lack of equipment, unknowns about spread of the virus, and concerns for their own safety and that of their families. Some health care workers have lost colleagues or family members to COVID-19. The mental health concerns the workforce faces are devastating and may linger long after the pandemic ends.  

Chronic Pain and Mental Health Often Interconnected

Chronic pain and mental health disorders often occur together. In fact, research suggests that chronic pain and mental health problems can contribute to and exacerbate the other.

Building Knowledge and Understanding to Help Prevent Suicide

Each year more than 45,000 lives are lost to suicide in the U.S. Suicide is the fourth leading cause of death for adults 35 to 54 years old and the second leading cause of death for youth and young adults aged 10 to 34 years. (1) But there is hope. New research is helping us understand who is at greatest risk—and this understanding will help psychiatrists and the mental health field at large save lives.