APA Blog

ADHD Increasing Among Adults

New research published earlier this month finds the number of adults with ADHD has been increasing. The study in   JAMA Open Network found the rate of ADHD has been increasing among adults of all races/ethnicities. However, there were substantially lower rates of detection among minority racial/ethnic subgroups. Rates of ADHD and rates remained highest for whites throughout the 10-year study period. 

Honoring Psychiatrist Carl Bell

This August we lost a towering figure in American community psychiatry. Carl Bell, M.D., died suddenly on Aug. 2 at the age of 71. Among community psychiatrists, Bell was a luminary whose work on cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic factors in mental illness was seminal. Bell’s influence—as a clinician, researcher, educator, mentor, public health advocate, and activist—was vast, broad, and deep.

Treatments are Available for the So-called Winter Blues

As we move toward winter with shorter daylight hours and falling temperatures, many people begin to feel the cloud of seasonal depression. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that occurs seasonally, typically in the winter months. SAD is not just the winter blues – SAD is a subtype of major depressive disorder. It can also occur during summer, but it is much less common that time of year.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder and a Culture of Perfection

Body dysmorphic disorder is an obsessive-compulsive related disorder that has garnered some media attention recently. Contrary to the offhand way it sometimes referred to in the media, body dysmorphic disorder is a serious mental health condition with potentially severe consequences.  Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder are preoccupied with what they see as flaws in their physical appearance. They believe they look ugly or abnormal. These flaws are not noticeable to others or only seem to others as very minor.

Possible Link Between Personality in High School and Dementia Risk

Can a person’s personality type in high school increase their risk of dementia late in life? A new study finds a connection between certain personality types and an increased risk of dementia later in life. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry in October 2019, looked at data on more than 80,000 participants in the Project Talent, a national sample of high school students in 1960, and Medicare data on dementia more than 50 years later, between 2011 and 2013.