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Help With Gambling Disorder

Curated and updated for the community by APA

Gambling disorder involves repeated problematic gambling behavior that causes significant problems or distress. It is also called gambling addiction or compulsive gambling.

For some people gambling becomes an addiction – the effects they get from gambling are similar to effects someone with alcoholism gets from alcohol. They can crave gambling the way someone craves alcohol or other substances. Compulsive gambling can lead to problems with finances, relationships and work, not to mention potential legal issues.

See definition, symptoms, & treatment

  • Nov 14, 2018
The Right Amount of Sleep for Your Best Reasoning, Problem-solving and Communication

Getting enough sleep is one of the main keys to good health, along with good nutrition and exercise, yet most of us do not get enough of it. In one national survey, nearly 30 percent of respondents reported getting less than an average of six hours of sleep per night. A new study looks specifically at the impact of sleep on cognitive ability.

  • Nov 13, 2018
World Kindness Day

On this World Kindness Day, Nov. 13, 2018, we take a look at some of the research showing how engaging in acts of kindness can benefit well-being. Engaging in acts of kindness is not only a good thing to do, but can actually help alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety, can improve workplace well-being, can be more beneficial to well-being than self-oriented actions, can reduce anxiety for socially anxious people, and can prompt others to engage in acts of kindness.

  • Nov 09, 2018
APA Honors Psychiatrists who Served in Vietnam in Wreath-Laying Ceremony

On Nov. 1, 2018, the American Psychiatric Association held a wreath-laying ceremony at the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. in honor of the service and sacrifice of psychiatrists who served during the Vietnam War.

Upcoming Events
Oct
2018
01
Gamblers Anonymous
  • Mon,  Oct  01 - Wed,  Oct  31
  • 10:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Find a meeting near you. For individuals and families.

Oct
2018
01
Gam-Anon
  • Mon,  Oct  01 - Sun,  May  27
  • 10:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Find a meeting near you. For individuals and families.

Mar
2019
01
National Problem Gambling Awareness Month
  • Fri,  Mar  01 - Sun,  Mar  31
  • 10:15 AM - 10:15 AM

National Council on Problem Gambling

A couple of friends and family members have told me they are concerned about my gambling, but I don’t think I have a problem, I just gamble for fun. How can I tell if I have a problem?

Gambling is a common, legal form of entertainment and recreation that is enjoyed by millions of people every day. The vast majority of people who gamble are able to do so without any long-lasting problems or harm. But, like alcohol, tobacco or drugs of abuse, gambling can become an addiction, and recent research has shown that up to 1 percent of the population is currently suffering from a gambling disorder. There are many different warning signs that gambling is becoming a problem. Among the most common signs are lying about gambling, not being able to stop or control gambling, spending excessive amounts of time gambling and being preoccupied by gambling.

Any gambling behavior that creates harm, distress and negative life problems could be a sign of a gambling disorder. Two simple questions to ask are: “Have you ever had to lie to people important to you about how much you gambled?” and “Have you ever felt the need to bet more and more money?” A yes answer to either question suggests that there may be a gambling problem. Read More

My friend is a frequent gambler and has repeatedly asked me for money. Should I help him out so he doesn’t get in legal trouble, or is that just contributing to the problem and allowing him to avoid getting help?

Borrowing money to relieve desperate financial problems caused by gambling is one of the diagnostic criteria of gambling disorder. Giving money to friends, even with the hope that it will help, often backfires and creates more problems and stress. A healthier way to help out a friend who is asking for money is to share your concern about borrowing money. Friends will appreciate sincere honesty, an expression of concern and an offer to help out emotionally. Maintaining a firm financial boundary of not giving money to a friend “in need” will help to motivate them to seek professional help or help them to see how serious their problem may be. Read More

I believe my husband has a gambling problem; would Gamblers Anonymous be a good place to suggest he start to get help?

Gambler’s Anonymous (GA) is a self-help group, based in the principles of 12-step recovery. It is available both for people with gambling disorders and for family members (Gam-Anon). This is an excellent place to start to seek immediate assistance with support, education and learning about the recovery process. GA is not a substitute for professional treatment and anyone with a gambling disorder or affected by someone’s gambling should seek professional help. Many states have problem gambling helplines that can provide referrals to professional treatment providers. The national problem gambling helpline is 1-800-522-4700. For states that do not have gambling treatment services, a good starting place would be to seek help from any locally trained addiction treatment program or specialist. Read More

expert-fong

About the Expert:

Timothy Fong, M.D.
Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry
Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA
Co-director, UCLA Gambling Studies Program

Mitchell's Story

Mitchell is a 43-year-old married man with two children, ages 12 and 9. He enjoyed gambling during high school and college, mainly with friends on occasional trips to Las Vegas or home poker games. In 2010, after securing a new job, he and his family moved to the West Coast. As part of this move, he relocated to a new home that was about 25 minutes from a casino. In 2012, his company downsized and he lost his job, which was shocking to him but not devastating. His wife went back to work and he became a stay-at-home dad.

Read More

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Editor's Choice

OCTOBER 2018

Mobile, online sports betting could increase bad gambling behaviors

Press of Atlantic City-Oct 4, 2018

With a prevalence rate of gambling addiction that is already more than twice the national average, New Jersey's aggressive introduction of mobile and online sports betting has raised some concerns among responsible gaming advocates and experts. Ease of access, expanded wagering options and increased marketing toward a new demographic of gambler are among the key issues that Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, said could amplify both the number of people who develop poor gambling behaviors and the severity of the problem for sports bettors in the Garden State.

SEPTEMBER 2018

Gambling addiction agencies worry addiction numbers could skyrocket

NJTV News-Sep 21, 2018

If gambling is a drug, New Jersey has become a one-stop pharmacy for gamblers to get their fix. With legalized sports betting, you now can bet online, on your phone, at the racetrack and the old fashioned way in the casino. Some will lose everything. At a conference by the Council of Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey, the new, easy access to placing bets sparked worry that the state’s gambling addiction problem will only grow worse.

SEPTEMBER 2018

Are we doing enough to help problem gamblers?

ESPN-Sep 19, 2018

In May, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992, a federal statute that limited regulated sports betting to primarily Nevada for 26 years.

Since the ruling, four additional states – Delaware, Mississippi, New Jersey and West Virginia – have started taking bets, with Pennsylvania and Rhode Island expected to be among the next wave of states to open sportsbooks. Problem gamblers, the services that attempt to help them, and opposition groups worried about any societal scourge that might result from expanded legal sports betting are concerned that their voices are being drowned out as more states open sportsbooks.

JULY 23, 2018

How Do Gambling Adictions Start?

The Sports Daily

Gambling has been a part of everyday life for centuries and has been incorporated into numerous cultures as a leisure activity. The industry has grown since its earlier days to become one of the biggest revenue generating sectors for top economies across the globe. The wide web allowed the player to access thousands of gaming options on their fingertips rather than have them go out and seek the establishments. Additionally, they can be accessed on mobile devices, which means they can be carried around anywhere the player goes and whipped out at a moment's notice.

JULY 10, 2018

Mobile phones could make sports betting more accessible – and addictive

Marketplace

For decades the only place you could legally wager on a basketball or football game was in Nevada. And to do it, you had to go to a casino 'sports book'— in essence, a room where bettors sit in cushy seats while watching games on panoramic screens, and giant digital billboards tick out numbers to help them calculate how much they stand to win, or lose, on each match-up. Advocates for problem gamblers, and experts who study gambling disorders, warn that putting sports betting at more people's fingertips increases the likelihood that some of them will develop a gambling addiction.

JUNE 28, 2018

Gaming or gambling? Online transactions blur boundaries

Science Daily

In-game purchasing systems, such as 'loot boxes', in popular online games resemble gambling and may pose financial risks for vulnerable players, according to gambling psychology researchers.

Physician Reviewed

Philip Wang, M.D., Dr.P.H.
August 2018