APA Blog

Category : Patients and Families

What Happens When You Quit, or at Least Really Cut Back, Your Social Media Use?

For many people, checking social media regularly and spending a lot of time on it is a part of everyday life. But what is the impact on your well-being if you just quit for a while, or at least significantly cut back? You’ll probably be at least a little bit better off, according to a couple of recent studies. Substantial research over the past few years has linked social media use with reduced well-being, sleep problems and increased loneliness, depression and mental distress.

African Americans Face a Greater Risk of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia and it affects about one-third of adults age 85 and older in the U.S., but some populations are disproportionally impacted. For instance, African Americans are about twice as likely as whites to have Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

Genetic Testing to Improve Psychiatric Medication Choice

Genetic testing is being marketed and used for a variety of different purposes, such as confirming or ruling out a suspected genetic condition or helping determine a person’s chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. It is also being marketed to improve the selection of medication for mental illness, such as depression. However, several recent expert reviews caution that while it holds much potential, the evidence does not yet show genetic testing is effective in improving psychiatric medication choices.

Eating Disorders, Weight-Shaming and “Clean” Eating

Eating disorders affect all kinds of people: women, men, young and old and from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Many factors likely contribute to developing eating disorders, including a range of biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors. Having a close relative with an eating disorder or a history of dieting are risk factors. High levels of body image dissatisfaction and setting unrealistically high expectations for oneself (perfectionism) also increase the risk

Support for Mental Health in the Workplace: Employee Perspective

An estimated one in five working age adults lives with a mental health condition, yet more than 60 percent do not receive treatment. When employees do receive effective treatment for mental illnesses, it also leads to increased productivity, lower absenteeism, and decreased disability costs. Many companies are increasingly providing resources and programs to support employee mental health and well-being. So how do employees think their employers are doing with these efforts? That is the question addressed in a recent national survey of employees conducted by the Harris Poll for the American Heart Association.*