APA Blog

Category : Autism

Project SEARCH: Increasing Employment Opportunities for Young Adults with Autism

Landing your first full-time job can be challenging for anyone, but for people with autism it’s especially challenging. Two years after high school, more than half of young adults with autism are not employed, according to Autism Speaks. The Project SEARCH Transition-to-Work program aims to help improve the odds for employment for young people with autism.

Autism Often Accompanied by Other Conditions

People with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder often have a variety of co-occurring health and mental health conditions, such as gastrointestinal problems and ADHD. More than 95 percent of children with autism have at least one co-occurring disorder or condition, according to a recent study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1) More than half of the children studied (53 percent of 4-year-olds and 69 percent of 8-year-olds had four or more additional conditions.

Predicting Autism in Infants: Early Identification and Early Treatment

According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in April this year, one in 59 children in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a very complex and variable condition. It is diagnosed based on observations of behavior in children as young as 2 years old, but it is often diagnosed much later. Interventions to treat autism symptoms are more effective the earlier they start, so identifying children earlier allows for starting treatment earlier, potentially lead to better outcomes.

Online Mental Health Screenings: A Potential First Step

Several organizations provide brief online screenings for depression, anxiety, PTSD and other mental health conditions. More than one million people took screenings through the Mental Health America site alone in 2016.

Direct-to-Consumer Advertising Linked to Changes in Medication Use Among People with Serious Mental Illness

People with serious mental illness exposed to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of medications are more likely to stop taking their medications than those not exposed to the advertising, according to new research published in Psychiatric Services in Advance.