Tobacco and Nicotine

Learn about various aspects of treating tobacco use disorders, including clinical, training, and policy considerations. As new topics emerge, more resources and information will be added to this page. The resources cover topics from the APA Work Group on Tobacco Use Disorders with the Council on Addiction Psychiatry, training, practice/clinical, reimbursement and legal issues from leading psychiatrists.


APA CME

  • Motivational Interviewing
    This training discusses motivational Interviewing (MI) which can be viewed as the essential clinical skill for engaging patients in treatment and motivating patients to reduce substance use and to follow through with specific recommended behavioral or pharmacological treatments. This presentation provides a didactic overview of motivational interviewing in the context of the neurobiology of addiction and other addiction treatments and serves as a precursor to learning motivational interviewing for integration into clinical practice.
    The APA designates this enduring CME activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.
  • Updates in Treating Tobacco Use Disorder
    Tobacco use rates, although declining in the general population, are still two to three times higher in individuals with a behavioral health condition (mental illness or addiction) and this group consumes at least a third of the tobacco sold in the United States. This presentation provides updates in treatment and review relevant issues related to poor outcomes including levels of nicotine dependence and lack of access to cessation treatments.
    The APA designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS) Trainings

  • Treatment of Tobacco in Primary Care
    Tobacco use disorder is still a major cause of preventable death that affects individuals with mental illness or other addictions to a great degree. Practice guidelines recommend that all smokers trying to quit should use pharmacotherapy as a first-line treatment. Tobacco withdrawal causes clinically significant symptoms of agitation, anxiety, restlessness, and impaired concentration. Medications are effective in reducing these withdrawal symptoms and at least doubling the smoker's chance of success in quitting smoking. This educational activity will review updates in evidence-based treatments for tobacco use disorder.
    American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry designates this performance improvement activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.
  • Update on Treatment of Tobacco Use Disorder
    Research supports that medications are effective in reducing nicotine withdrawal symptoms and at least doubling the smoker's chance of success in quitting smoking. Nicotine withdrawal causes symptoms of agitation, anxiety, restlessness, and impaired concentration that can mimic symptoms of psychiatric illness. Pharmacotherapy may be even more important to smokers with mental illness as they have higher levels of nicotine dependence than other smokers. This webinar will review updates in evidence-based treatments for tobacco use disorder.
    The APA designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 (one) AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.