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Plenary
Opening Plenary Session ft. Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use and Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Sonja Gaines, M.B.A., and Keri L. Waterland, Ph.D., M.A.C., M.A.O.B.

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  11:10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. EDT

Description

The conference will open with remarks by Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use and Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Dr. Delphin-Rittmon will outline SAMHSA’s priorities and initiatives to increase access to evidence-based care nationally. Dr. Delphin-Rittmon's remarks will be followed by presentations by two State Mental Health Commissioners: Ms. Sonja Gaines, M.B.A., Deputy Executive Commissioner for Intellectual and Developmental Disability and Behavioral Health Services at the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, and Dr. Keri L. Waterland, Ph.D., M.A.C., M.A.O.B., Division Director, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery at Washington State Health Care Authority. Presentations by the State Mental Health Commissioners will demonstrate innovative efforts that have led to high-quality sustainable services, particularly in community settings. The session will conclude with a roundtable discussion between all three participants.

Presenters

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Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, Ph.D.

Dr. Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon is currently Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. She previously served as Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) and served in this role for six years. Prior positions held at DMHAS include Deputy Commissioner, Senior Policy Advisor and Director of the department’s Office of Multicultural Healthcare Equity. In her role as Commissioner, Dr. Delphin-Rittmon was committed to promoting recovery oriented, integrated, and culturally responsive services and systems that foster dignity, respect, and meaningful community inclusion.

Prior to her current appointment, Dr. Delphin-Rittmon was an Adjunct Associate Professor at Yale University where she served on faculty for the past 20 years. While at Yale Dr. Delphin-Rittmon served as the Director of Cultural Competence and Research Consultation with the Yale University Program for Recovery and Community Health.

In May 2014, Dr. Delphin-Rittmon completed a two-year White House appointment working as a Senior Advisor to the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While at SAMHSA, she worked on a range of policy initiatives addressing behavioral health equity, workforce development, and healthcare reform.

Through her 20 year career in the behavioral health field Dr. Delphin-Rittmon has extensive experience in the design, evaluation, and administration of mental health, substance use and prevention services and systems and has received several awards for advancing policy in these areas. Most recently, she received the 2019 State Service Award from the National Association of State Drug and Alcohol Directors and the 2016 Mental Health Award for Excellence from the United Nations Committee on Mental Health.

She received her B.A. in Social Science from Hofstra University in 1989, her M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University 1992 and 2001, respectively, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical community psychology at Yale University in 2002.

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Sonja Gaines, M.B.A.

Sonja Gaines, M.B.A., serves as the Deputy Executive Commissioner for Intellectual and Developmental Disability and Behavioral Health Services at the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC). With more than 25 years of community mental health leadership experience, she currently is responsible for a $1.5 billion operation overseeing the statewide policy and delivery of community-based services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and behavioral health conditions through Texas Health and Human Services Commission.

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Keri L. Waterland, Ph.D., M.A.C., M.A.O.B.

Keri Waterland started her role at the Washington State Health Care Authority as the Division Director of the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery on May 1, 2019. Prior to that she was with the Washington State Senate for two legislative sessions working with the Human Services, Reentry and Rehabilitation Committee. Prior to her work with the Senate, Keri served in a variety of clinical and executive positions with the Department of Social and Health Services, and the Department of Corrections. Her state services started over twelve years ago as an intern at Western State Hospital and it’s been a great experience ever since. Keri holds a Doctorate in Forensic Psychology with an emphasis in public policy and law, as well as master’s degrees in Counseling, Forensic Psychology, and Organizational Behavior.

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Breakout A
Structural Trauma in Communities

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  12:30 - 2:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Sociopolitical determinants of health have a considerable impact on trauma in individuals and communities. Trauma can consist of neighborhood violence, gun violence, mass shootings, police violence, and incarceration. This session will explore the policies that have been developed to address trauma as a social determinant, the level of success of those policies, and their practical application to improve resiliency within diverse populations.

Presenters

Sarah Y. Vinson, M.D. (Moderator)

Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, GA based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Vinson is also the founder of Lorio Forensics, which provide consultation in a wide variety of cases in criminal, civil and family court cases.

Jack Saul, Ph.D.

Jack Saul, Ph.D., is the founding director of the International Trauma Studies Program (ITSP), a research and training institute based in New York City. He has served on the faculties of New York University School of Medicine – Department of Psychiatry, the New School for Social Research, Clinical Psychology Program, and Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health. As a psychologist and family therapist, he has created a number of clinical and community-based programs in NYC and abroad for populations that have endured disaster, war, torture, and political violence.

Kenneth Thompson, M.D.

Kenneth S. Thompson, M.D., lives in Pittsburgh. He graduated from Kenyon College and Boston University School of Medicine, where he was a National Health Service Corps Scholar. He was a resident in psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a postdoc in mental health services research at Yale. He has been faculty at Yale and the University of Pittsburgh. He was the Director for Medical Affairs at the Center for Mental Health Services in SAMHSA. He is the Chief Medical Officer of the Pennsylvania Psychiatric Leadership Council, a policy and advocacy organization.

Denese Shervington, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Shervington has an intersectional career in psychiatry and public mental health. She is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Tulane University School of Medicine and the President and CEO of the Institute for Women and Ethnic Studies (IWES), a community-based translational public health institute. At IWES, Dr. Shervington directs a federally funded trauma-informed Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program as well as the community-based post-disaster mental health recovery division at that she created after Hurricane Katrina. At Tulane, Dr. Shervington provides psychotherapy supervision for Psychiatry residents. She has an illustrious career in public mental health and population health, with posts at the national, state and local level. She also has extensive clinical and community expertise in PTSD and trauma-informed response.

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Breakout B
AACP Self-assessment for Modification of Anti-Racism Tool (SMART)

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  12:30 - 2:00 p.m. EDT

Description

In response to a reinvigorated national dialogue around structural racism, the American Association for Community Psychiatry (AACP) aimed to create a tool or roadmap for community behavioral health providers that would (1) provide metrics specific to disparity and inequity issues in community behavioral health; (2) extend beyond cultural competency and linguistic appropriateness to incorporate structural inequity; and (3) promote a stepwise, concrete quality improvement process than could be adapted for self-directed use in community behavioral health settings.

There are multiple prior examples of organizing principles and frameworks to address inequity and racism in healthcare (Spitzer-Shohat & Chin, 2019; Metzl & Hansen, 2014; Gomez et al, 2016). Despite the rich array of content to draw from in guiding equity-focused, anti-racist work in health care, none of these existing resources fully address the three key elements relevant to the AACP’s goal.

This session will introduce the Self-assessment for Modification of Anti-Racism Tool (SMART), a quality improvement tool that aims to meet the AACP’s needs in facilitating organizational change in community behavioral healthcare. In this session, attendees will review previously described health inequity frameworks, highlighting their strengths and their limitations as relates to addressing structural racism in community behavioral health practice. We will then introduce the key components of the SMART, describing our process in developing this organizational tool based on key inequity issues that are most relevant to community mental health practice.

Presenters

Jacqueline Maus Feldman, M.D. (Moderator)

Jacqueline Feldman, M.D., is Professor Emerita, UAB Dept of Psychiatry, and NAMI Associate Medical Director. She served as a federal court monitor for women’s mental health in the Alabama DOC, and the DOJ in its investigation of GA State Hospitals. She is Past President of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists and served on the APF Board. She is Chair of the 2019 APA AM Scientific Program Committee. Dr. Feldman has published and spoken extensively on schizophrenia, dual diagnosis, public policy development, the importance of advocacy, mental health and criminal justice, and recovery. She is Editor-in-Chief of the Community Mental Health Journal.

Sosunmolu Shoyinka, M.D.

Dr. Sosunmolu Shoyinka serves as Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS). Prior to this he served as Medical Director for Home State and Sunflower Health Plans and as Director of the Missouri Behavioral Pharmacy Management program. He is Triple Board certified and holds an MBA from Kelley Business School. Dr. Shoyinka teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, serves on the Board of the American Association for Community Psychiatry and has been recognized as a Black leader shaping the future of Psychiatry.

Kenneth Minkoff, M.D.

Kenneth Minkoff, M.D. is a board-certified psychiatrist with a certificate of additional qualifications in addiction psychiatry; a dedicated community psychiatrist, and currently is a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Rachel Melissa Talley, M.D.

Rachel Talley, M.D. is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Fellowship in Community Psychiatry. She works clinically in community psychiatry as a staff attending at Horizon House, Inc. Dr. Talley received her B.A. from Harvard University and her M.D. from Stanford University. She completed both her adult residency training and public psychiatry fellowship at Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is an Early Career Board Representative for the American Association for Community Psychiatry.

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Deep Dive A
The Self-Assessment for Modification of Anti-Racism Tool (SMART): An Introduction

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

In 2020, a national dialogue on systemic racism was reinvigorated by the highly publicized deaths of several unarmed Black Americans, including George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. In response, the AACP Board considered how to promote concrete, meaningful action to support its membership in measurably addressing structures and policies that promote racism. The AACP recognized a unique opportunity to model improvement with regards to antiracism efforts both within organizations and also within the services that we represent. The SMART Tool was a key output of these discussions. The AACP SMART Tool is a quality improvement tool that aims to facilitate organizational change in community behavioral healthcare. It incorporates domains specific to structural racism and disparities issues in community behavioral healthcare. SMART provides a roadmap for community behavioral health providers that facilitates continuous quality improvement in combating structural racism by (1) providing metrics specific to disparity and inequity issues in community behavioral health, (2) extending beyond culture competency and linguistic appropriateness to incorporate structural inequity, and (3) promoting a stepwise, concrete quality improvement process that could be adapted for self-directed use in community behavioral health settings.

Challenge Questions

  • How does your organization initiate, facilitate and sustain conversations around structural racism in a productive way?
  • How could the SMART Tool facilitate continuous, self-directed anti-racism activity within your organization?

Facilitators

Sosunmolu Shoyinka, M.D.

Dr. Sosunmolu Shoyinka serves as Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS). Prior to this he served as Medical Director for Home State and Sunflower Health Plans and as Director of the Missouri Behavioral Pharmacy Management program. He is Triple Board certified and holds an MBA from Kelley Business School. Dr. Shoyinka teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, serves on the Board of the American Association for Community Psychiatry and has been recognized as a Black leader shaping the future of Psychiatry.

Rachel Talley, M.D.

Rachel Talley, M.D. is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Fellowship in Community Psychiatry. She works clinically in community psychiatry as a staff attending at Horizon House, Inc. Dr. Talley received her B.A. from Harvard University and her M.D. from Stanford University. She completed both her adult residency training and public psychiatry fellowship at Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is an Early Career Board Representative for the American Association for Community Psychiatry.

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Deep Dive B
Crossing the Thin Blue Line: Psychiatrists Working In Law Enforcement & Corrections While Advocating for Social Justice

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

During the summer of 2020, following the murder of George Floyd, Minneapolis, MN became ground zero for the an uprising that brought a renewed focus on racism within the US and the necessity of examining the criminal justice system, especially policies. For years, psychiatrists have evaluated and treated patients who have experienced trauma due to exposure to neighborhood violence, gun violence, mass shootings, police violence, and incarceration. Other patients never have access to treatment or their symptoms are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This deep dive, led by two minority psychiatrists involved in law enforcement/corrections, will continue the conversation sparked by the breakout session "Structural Trauma in Communities" to discuss the role of psychiatrists in treating direct and vicarious trauma related to explores to violence, police violence, and incarcerations.

Challenge Questions

  • What specific steps can the APA and its District Branches take to address health disparities and systemic racism within the criminal justice system?
  • How do psychiatric physicians advocate for police reform and the health and welfare of their communities and remain supportive of the men and women who work in corrections and law enforcement?
  • As Martin Luther King, Jr. writes in "The Other America", is violence truly the language of the oppressed?
  • How can psychiatric physicians address stigma related to mental health treatment among their patients and families as well as the general public so more individuals are likely to seek treatment for trauma related symptoms?

Facilitators

Dionne Hart, M.D.

Dr. Dionne Hart is board certified in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. She is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Mayo Clinic. In 2014, Dr. Hart was named Minnesota Psychiatrist of the Year. In 2017, Dr. Hart received the National Alliance on Mental Illness Exemplary Psychiatrist Award. Dr. Hart is an APA delegate to the AMA, Chairperson of the Assembly Committee on Community and Public Psychiatry and member of the Council on Advocacy and Government Relations. Dr. Hart is Region 4 chairperson on the National Medical Association’s Board of Trustees. In 2020, Minnesota Physician journal named her one of the 100 most influential health care leaders in Minnesota.

Raymond Matthew Reyes, M.D.

Raymond Matthew Reyes, M.D., is the second of five sons of immigrant Filipinos, an anaesthesiologist, and a nurse. He was schooled in the Philippines, including medical school, after which he rejoined his family in the US. After over 11 years on active duty with the Air Force, he worked as a community and, more recently (11+ years), a correctional psychiatrist. Dr. Reyes has been active in organized medicine and organized psychiatry with the Air Force, and later in Alaska, Pennsylvania, and California. He is a past president and one of four Delegates to the APA Assembly from the Northern California District Branch. He has also pursued creative writing, including and not limited to serving as the DB Newsletter Editor for a decade.

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Deep Dive C
Burnout and Changing Cultural Norms in Academic Medicine and Clinical Practice

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

The widespread recognition of physician burnout has opened the space for conversation about the physician experience of the clinical and academic work environment. This holds the promise of constructive change. But, it is not yet clear what the impact of these conversations is on the workplace experience of physicians and on the cultural norms of physician interaction with colleagues, leaders and patients.

Challenge Questions

  • Is there increased interest in and tolerance for conversation in your clinical or academic work environment for meaningful discussion of burnout, moral injury, or dissatisfaction?
  • Have these conversations resulted in tangible changes that have addressed the problems?
  • What other impacts are there in your setting of the increased awareness of physician burnout?

Facilitators

Mary Vance, M.D.

Dr. Vance is a Member and past Vice-Chair of the APA’s Committee on Psychiatrist Well-being and Burnout. She is also a Lieutenant Commander with the US Public Health Service and Director of Behavioral Health, Pacific Area, for the US Coast Guard. She holds an academic appointment as Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Vance’s interests focus broadly on improving mental health care services and delivery for trauma- and stressor-related disorders, particularly in the military/veteran and health care professional populations.

Richard Summers, M.D.

Richard F. Summers, M.D., is Senior Residency Advisor and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. He was Co-Director of Residency Training at Penn from 1998 to 2017. Dr. Summers is a nationally recognized educator, author and clinician. He is Treasurer of the American Psychiatric Association and a Past President of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT). He chaired the APA Committee on Psychiatrist Wellbeing and Burnout from 2018-2020. Dr. Summers’ work includes numerous books and articles on physician wellbeing, psychodynamic therapy, therapeutic alliance and psychiatry residency training.

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Deep Dive D
After 40 Years of Homeless Services, What Have We Learned? What Are We Doing Differently? What Should We Be Doing?

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Since the early 1980s, we have defined, counted, tracked and provided multiple interventions for homeless mentally ill individuals. We have looked at outreach, housing, and case management models, and clinical, rehabilitation, and social approaches. Yet, somehow, from San Francisco to New York, our streets are filled with those without housing and those without treatment. What is psychiatry’s role in working with this population? What is the best that we know? Are we doing something wrong? Should we be doing something different and if so, how?

Challenge Questions

  • Do psychiatry, and psychiatrists, have a role to play in the overall problem of homelessness and mental illness? How much beyond our clinical expertise should we go?
  • What have we learned since the 1980s? How do we implement what we’ve learned?

Facilitator

Stephen Mark Goldfinger, M.D.

Dr. Goldfinger is a community psychiatrist who spent his entire career working with the most disaffiliated and disenfranchised patients. He designed, and co-directed San Francisco’s Healthcare for the Homeless program. He was part of the original APA Taskforce on Homelessness and founding Chair of the Committee on Poverty and Homelessness. While Clinical Director of Harvard’s Mass Mental Health Center he served as principal investigator of a $13 million McKinney grant. He is Distinguished Service Professor and Chair Emeritus of Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.

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Breakout A
Competencies for Trainees

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:30 - 4:00 p.m. EDT

Description

It is important to carefully evaluate and revise expectations and competencies for trainees to incorporate sociopolitical issues. Early attention to these critical determinants of mental health will help to improve the level of care future clinicians can provide to the diverse patients under their care.

Presenters

Auralyd Padilla Candelario, M.D. (Moderator)

Auralyd Padilla Candelario, M.D., is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. She completed her residency and fellowship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Padilla is the University of Massachusetts Medical School Department of Psychiatry Director for Diversity and Inclusion. She has served in multiple national committees and task force groups to enhance diversity and inclusion within organizations and seek culturally sensitive psychiatric care and medical education. She presents on these topics at local and national meetings as part of the American Psychiatric Association, American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Training, and the Association for Academic Psychiatry.

Enrico Guanzon Castillo, M.D.

Dr. Castillo is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Social Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California – Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Castillo’s research focuses on health equity and health justice, serious mental illness, and community-public-academic partnerships. He is currently leading a NIMH-funded project on the jail-to-homelessness pipeline experienced by individuals with serious mental illness (K23 MH125201). He is also an Associate Director of Residency Education at UCLA and teaches about homelessness and structural competency.

Dwight E. Kemp, M.D.

Dr. Dwight Kemp is a psychiatry resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center and is an American Psychiatric Association Public Psychiatry Fellow. His clinical and scholarly pursuits focus on the service and empowerment of marginalized, minority, and underserved populations including mental health policy, academic psychiatry, leadership development and mental health equity.

Michelle Durham, M.D., M.P.H.

Michelle P. Durham, MD, MPH, FAPA, DFAACAP is the Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM)/Boston Medical Center (BMC). She is a board certified physician specializing in pediatric and adult psychiatry with additional board certification in addiction medicine. Her public health and clinical roles have always been in marginalized communities. She is dedicated to health equity and advocacy for equitable mental health treatment globally and locally.

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Breakout B
Impact of Racism within Large Organizations

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  2:30 - 4:00 p.m. EDT

Description

The need for equity and inclusiveness in mental health care has never been greater. The APA and AMA are firmly committed to embracing the diversity of our members, staff, organization, profession, and, ultimately, the patient communities we serve. This session will explore how we are putting our vision and mission into action to address structural racism, foundational concepts on health equity, including the various types of bias and discrimination commonly seen in healthcare, and a new framework for advancing racial justice and equity in the health care arena by leveraging high-performance quality and safety practices to systematically make inequities visible and to address and resolve them as an integral part of health care practice.

Presenters

Vivian Pender, M.D. (Moderator)

Vivian B. Pender, M.D. is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Weill Cornell Medical College and a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst at Columbia University. Dr. Pender has mentored and taught medical students, graduate students, residents, fellows and post-graduates for thirty-five years.

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Regina James, M.D.

Dr. Regina James is Deputy Medical Director and Chief of the Division of Diversity and Health Equity at the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. James is a child and adolescent psychiatrist with over 25 years of experience, providing leadership and direction in the planning, policy development and implementation of national and international health disparity programs and initiatives for children and families. She received the NIH Directors Award for exceptional leadership in the promotion and development of scientific programs addressing gaps in minority health and healthcare disparities.

Michele Reid, M.D.

Dr. Reid attended Detroit Public Schools (DPS) and received her undergraduate and medical education at Fisk University and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, TN. After completing her psychiatric residency at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI, she served as Medical Director at Northeast Guidance Center and then as Medical Director at the Detroit - Wayne County Community Mental Health Agency. Currently, she is the Chief Medical Officer at CNS Healthcare and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Wayne State University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences.

Dilip V. Jeste, M.D.

Dr. Dilip Jeste is Senior Associate Dean for Healthy Aging and Senior Care, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Estelle and Edgar Levi Memorial Chair in Aging, Director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, and Co-Director of the UC San Diego-IBM Center on Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living. He is a geriatric neuropsychiatrist specializing in successful psychosocial aging and the neurobiology of wisdom with 750+ peer-reviewed journals articles, 160+ book chapters, and 14 published books.

Karthik Sivashanker, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Karthik Sivashanker is the Vice President of Equitable Health Systems & Innovation in the Center for Health Equity at the American Medical Association, and a Medical Director in Quality, Safety, and Equity at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He's a psychiatrist at Justice Resource Institute and serves as a faculty member at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Dr. Sivashanker attended college and medical school at Northwestern University in Illinois. He completed psychiatry residency at NYP Weill Cornell in New York and a psychosomatic medicine fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is a graduate of the Harvard Medical School Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality and received a Master’s in Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health.

As a former Fulbright scholar, he conducted research in Venezuela on the vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS in rural mountain communities. As a former VA Under Secretary for Health Diffusion of Excellence Gold Fellow, he led efforts to standardize and improve the process of substance use screening and triage for Veterans. His work has focused on driving racial justice and equity in the health care arena by leveraging high-performance quality and safety practices to systematically make inequities visible and to address and resolve them as an integral part of health care delivery.

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Deep Dive A
Are You More Than Just a Prescriber?

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Psychiatrists are expensive. From the very beginning of community care, pressure to confine them solely to the role of “prescriber” has existed. Such pressure is not equally strong everywhere, and the need for medical knowledge has been compensated by the widespread emergence of the “medical director” role. In this Deep Dive, we will discuss strategies to play a broader, more influential role than mere prescribers in multi-disciplinary teams and organizations. We will step out of the medical model and consider both internal and external factors that affect job satisfaction and clinical care.

Challenge Questions

  • How can we re-frame our role as community psychiatrists?
  • How can we use all our skills and knowledge?
  • How do we train current and future community psychiatrists?

Facilitators

Stephanie LeMelle, M.D., M.S.

Dr. LeMelle is the Director of Public Psychiatry Education at Columbia University Dept of Psychiatry/ New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is also the Director of the Public Psychiatry fellowship. Dr. LeMelle was Vice President of the American Association of Community Psychiatrist and continues on the board as a “Member at Large”. She is particularly interested in the treatment and care of people with serious mental illness and complex needs. Dr. Le Melle has served as advisor and member on several committees and boards that focus on the interface between legal systems and mental health.

Mira Bodic, M.D.

Dr. Mira Bodic completed her medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest, Romania, and her residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. She is an alum of the Public Psychiatry Fellowship at Columbia University, where she is currently on faculty. She specializes in Emergency Psychiatry, with a particular focus of bringing recovery-oriented care and a trauma informed approach to acute care settings. She is using her interest in teaching and adult learning, and the interface between healthcare and technology, in her role at Maimonides Medical Center Residency Training Program. Mira is currently the president for the Brooklyn Psychiatric Society and an active member of the American Association of Community Psychiatry.

Ludwing Salamanca, M.D.

Ludwing is part of the faculty of the Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowships, and works in an integrated medicine and mental health program serving a mostly Hispanic underserved population. He additionally participates in different domestic and international initiatives that aim to build the capacity of providers to assess and manage mental health problems. His areas of interest are integrated and collaborative care, global mental health, and medical education.

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Deep Dive B
Implementing Upstream Strategies for Equitable School Mental Health Programs

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

For over 40 years Healthy People (HP) has worked at elimination of racial health disparities by establishing national priorities, and identifying health improvement measures. Data indicate that some health indicators are improving for all racial/ethnic groups, however this gap between groups remains constant. In setting HP 2030 goals, the recommendation was to prioritize multi sectoral topics - social determinants of health (SDOH) such as poverty reduction and educational improvements. This session will discuss strategies for implementing the aforementioned upstream strategies in creating equitable school mental health programs.

Challenge Questions

  • How can schools think at a system, campus and classroom level to begin working through these upstream challenges?
  • What can psychiatrists do to support schools and affect these upstream challenges?
  • Communicating equity requires us to explore privilege, power, and the ‘isms’ that exist in our society.
  • In school systems, openly and honestly acknowledging pervasive systems that are in place is an important first step to addressing equitable practices to support school mental health needs.

Facilitators

Natalie Fikac, Ed.D.

Dr. Natalie Fikac serves as the Senior Administrative Program Coordinator at the South Southwest MHTTC. Her work focuses on supporting state education agencies and schools to shape comprehensive school mental health systems across Region 6. Her educational experience began over 25 years ago as an elementary school teacher, reading interventionist, professional school counselor, campus administrator and district level administrator. Dr. Fikac holds a Masters in Education in School Counseling and School Administration from Sam Houston State University and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Lamar University.

Suganya Sockalingam, Ph.D.

Dr. Suganya Sockalingam is a Founding Partner of Change Matrix, LLC a small minority and women owned disadvantaged business that works to motivate, manage and measure systems change. Change Matrix supports agencies to address diversity, cultural and linguistic competence, cross-cultural communication, as well as leadership, collaboration, and conflict management. Currently, Dr. Sockalingam serves as a training and technical assistance liaison and provider for several technical assistance centers, including: the Pacific Southwest Mental Health Technology Transfer Center for Integrated Health Services funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, and the Technical Assistance Resource Center of the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, HRSA.

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Deep Dive C
Navigating Racially Biased Perceptions in Mental Health Services

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Our perceptions are shaped by the tools we use to experience the world and the information we absorb and apply to our experiences. This interaction in a society structured around a perceived racial hierarchy buttressed by structural and cultural racism produces racially biased perceptions that distort and disrupt our capacity to provide equitable mental health services. In order to provide high quality mental health services to all those in need, we must acknowledge these perceptions and subvert their impact on rapport-building, diagnoses, treatment interventions and resource allocation.

Challenge Questions

  • What do you think the sources of racist perceptions are for you and how do you think they can be altered in pursuit of equity in mental health services?
  • Negative stereotypes continue to be powerful despite the egalitarian norms we purport to hold. Media plays a significant role in shaping our perceptions of race. For many Whites and people of other races and ethnicities, the media’s portrayal of Black men, women and children is the primary basis for their knowledge and emotional reaction. For those whose knowledge of race is largely mediated through the media, race itself triggers a complex set of emotions: fear, envy, anxiety, but also admiration and desire. How does this affect our work as mental health service professionals?

Facilitator

Jessica Elizabeth Isom, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Jessica Elizabeth Isom is an early career community psychiatrist, public speaker, medical educator and consultant for diversity, equity, inclusion and antiracism projects. Driven by a passion for collaborative leadership, she takes pride in providing the conceptual frameworks and psychological safety necessary to expand the growing edges of her clients and peers. Dr. Isom draws on her psychiatric training and humble background to connect across differences in power, education, and perspective to foster a collaborative approach to achieving racial justice and equity in medicine and beyond.

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Deep Dive D
Teaching Structural Competency in Psychiatric Education

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

The construct of Structural Competency, as first described by Metzl and Hansen in 2014 has been promoted through all areas of medical education, including psychiatric education. Its importance, relevance and urgency has been underscored by the events of the past year. In this deep dive, we will explore if, how and to what extent structural competency is being incorporated into psychiatric education at all levels, especially during residency., and discuss the AACP's model curriculum as a resource.

Challenge Questions

  • If you are involved in psychiatric education, either as a learner, teacher or both, to what extent have the components of structural competency been incorporated? Is it really happening? If so, how?
  • What are some effective and practical ways to incorporate structural competency into psychiatric education? (Participants are encouraged to share specific examples of how some of the core concepts of structural competency have been taught or modeled)

Facilitators

Robert Cotes, M.D.

Robert O. Cotes, M.D., is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is Director of the Grady Clinical and Research Program for Psychosis, which comprises of three clinical programs: 1) PSTAR Clinic (Persistent Symptoms: Treatment, Assessment and Recovery) which focuses on clozapine, 2) Project ARROW (an early psychosis program) and 3) Open Dialogue Atlanta. He serves as a Psychiatrist Expert for the American Psychiatric Association’s SMI Adviser initiative.

Dwight Kemp, M.D.

Dr. Dwight Kemp is a psychiatry resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center and is an American Psychiatric Association Public Psychiatry Fellow. His clinical and scholarly pursuits focus on the service and empowerment of marginalized, minority, and underserved populations including mental health policy, academic psychiatry, leadership development and mental health equity.

Courtney McMickens, M.D.

Courtney McMickens, M.D., M.P.H., M.H.S., is board certified in general adult and child and adolescent psychiatry. She is currently the NC Associate State Medical Director at Eleanor Health, a growing company with the mission of improving the lives of individuals affected by addiction and mental illness. Dr. McMickens earned her M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.P.H. at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She completed general psychiatry residency at the University of Pennsylvania and a child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Cambridge Health Alliance. She went on to complete the RWJ Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at Yale School of Medicine, earning a Master of Health Sciences (M.H.S.) degree.

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Breakout A
Integrated Care and Its Role in Reducing Disparities

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:30 - 6:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Integrated and collaborative care has an important role in reducing health disparities and achieving mental health equity for all patients. This session will consider strategies to incorporate attention to racial/ethnic equity and social determinants in order to enhance patient outcomes.

Presenters

Sosunmolu Shoyinka, M.D. (Moderator)

Dr. Sosunmolu Shoyinka serves as Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS). Prior to this he served as Medical Director for Home State and Sunflower Health Plans and as Director of the Missouri Behavioral Pharmacy Management program. He is Triple Board certified and holds an MBA from Kelley Business School. Dr. Shoyinka teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, serves on the Board of the American Association for Community Psychiatry and has been recognized as a Black leader shaping the future of Psychiatry.

Maga Jackson-Triche, M.D.

Dr. Jackson-Triche’s current role (appointed March 29, 2021) is that of Assistant Vice Chancellor and UCSF Health Executive Advisor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI). She is a Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry in the School of Medicine. Immediately prior to this new role, she was the Vice Chair for the UCSF Department of Psychiatry and UCSF Health Vice President for Behavioral Health Services and was named a winner of the 2020 UCSF Excellent Physician Award.

Jennifer Hu, M.D.

Jennifer Hu is a first-year child and adolescent psychiatry fellow at Duke University. She completed her adult residency training at Cambridge Health Alliance.

Lori E. Raney, M.D.

Dr. Lori Raney is a board-certified psychiatrist and Principal with Health Management Associates in Denver, Colorado. She is considered a leading authority on the collaborative care model and the bidirectional integration of primary care and behavioral health. Her work focuses on service evaluation, gap analysis and design and training of multidisciplinary teams to implement evidence-based practices to improve the identification and treatment of mental illness in the primary care setting and improve the health status of patients with serious mental illness behavioral health settings.

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Breakout B
Supporting the Diverse Peer Specialist Workforce

  •  Thursday, October 14
  •  4:30 - 6:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Peer specialists draw closely on their lived experience to support self-management and model successful recovery. This lived experience will be different for peers across varied racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. As our nation begins to come to terms with the legacy of structural racism and discrimination, many peer specialists have needed to simultaneously navigate their roles as peer providers and as members of underrepresented groups. In this session, you’ll learn about ways to better support peer specialists from diverse groups in your organizations.

Presenters

Benjamin G. Druss, M.D. (Moderator)

Benjamin Druss, M.D., as the first Rosalynn Carter Chair in Mental Health at Emory University, is working to build linkages between mental health, physical health, and public health. At Emory, he works closely with the Carter Center Mental Program, where he is a member of the Mental Health Taskforce and Journalism Advisory Board. Dr. Druss serves on the editorial boards of JAMA Psychiatry, the American Journal of Psychiatry, and General Hospital Psychiatry and edits Psychiatric Services’ Integrated Care Column. He is a member of NIMH’s National Advisory Mental Health Council.

Keris Myrick, M.B.A., M.S.

Keris Jän Myrick is a Co-Director of The Mental Health Strategic Impact Initiative (S2i) and serves on the Board of the National Association of Peer Specialists (N.A.P.S.). Ms. Myrick has over 15 years of experience in mental health services innovations, transformation, peer workforce development and authored peer reviewed articles and book chapters. She held executive positions at local/county, federal, and national levels and was the Board President of NAMI. Ms. Myrick is a Certified Personal Medicine Coach, has an M.S. in I-O psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology

Roslind D. Hayes, B.S.

Roslind Hayes is the Director of the Peer Support and Training for the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network (GMHCN). She is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University with a B.S. in Psychology. Roslind is in long-term recovery from mental health and addictive disease challenges, and she became a Certified Peer Specialist (CPS) in 2010. Later that year, she began working for the GMHCN at the Decatur Peer Support and Wellness Center. In 2013 she became Certified Addiction Empowerment Specialist. Roslind supports the GMHCN as a trainer/facilitator.

Chris Johnson, M.F.A.

Chris Johnson, MFA, CPS, CPS-AD is the Director of Communications for the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, where he is responsible for disseminating information about recovery and wellness opportunities to behavioral health peers and providers across the state, as well as grant-writing, public speaking, and supporting the development of programs, curricula, and presentations. Since joining GMHCN, Chris has contributed to the significant expansion of the outreach and impact of GMHCN at the local, state, and national level.

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Plenary
Plenary Session Two

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  11:05 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. EDT

Description

Day two of the conference will open with a fireside chat on the sociopolitical determinants and sociocultural issues at play in mental health care today. This session will serve as a framework for discussions throughout the day’s breakout sessions and further explore how frontline clinicians can effectively understand sociopolitical determinants of mental health to the benefit of their patients.

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Breakout A
How to Teach Sociocultural Issues in Psychiatry

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  12:30 - 2:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Incorporating sociocultural issues into training curricula is critical to the development of today's learners in a world that is becoming increasingly diverse.

Presenters

Auralyd Padilla Candelario, M.D. (Moderator)

Auralyd Padilla Candelario, M.D., is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. She completed her residency and fellowship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Padilla is the University of Massachusetts Medical School Department of Psychiatry Director for Diversity and Inclusion. She has served in multiple national committees and task force groups to enhance diversity and inclusion within organizations and seek culturally sensitive psychiatric care and medical education. She presents on these topics at local and national meetings as part of the American Psychiatric Association, American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Training, and the Association for Academic Psychiatry.

Enrico Guanzon Castillo, M.D.

Dr. Castillo is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Social Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California – Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Castillo’s research focuses on health equity and health justice, serious mental illness, and community-public-academic partnerships. He is currently leading a NIMH-funded project on the jail-to-homelessness pipeline experienced by individuals with serious mental illness (K23 MH125201). He is also an Associate Director of Residency Education at UCLA and teaches about homelessness and structural competency.

Ayana Jordan, M.D., Ph.D.

Ayana Jordan, MD, PhD, an Addiction Psychiatrist, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry, at Yale School of Medicine. She, is dedicated to creating spaces and opportunities for more people of color, specifically Black women in academia who are vastly underrepresented. The fundamental message of equity and inclusion has informed her research, clinical work and leadership duties at Yale and beyond. Dr. Jordan was the first Black Associate Program Directors for the Yale Psychiatry Residency, a large group of 64 physicians providing mental health and addiction services throughout Yale medical systems in the state of CT.

Arden Dingle, M.D.

Arden D. Dingle, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and the Psychiatry Residency Program Director. Her career has focused on medical education with considerable experience running and teaching in Psychiatry and Child/Adolescent Residency Programs as well as in Medical Student Curricula. Dr Dingle’s research focuses on medical education. Nationally, she is involved with the American College of Psychiatrists as the Editor in Chief of the PRITE Editorial Board, a member of the American Association for Community Psychiatry Curriculum Committee, a member of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Ethics Committee, and a member of the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium Chronic Disease Prevention and Management Interest Group. Dr. Dingle clinically has worked extensively with children, adolescents, adults and families in a range of settings, primarily using interdisciplinary and/or integrated care models.

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Breakout B
Highlighting Innovation in Mental Health Services in Rural and Indigenous Communities

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  12:30 - 2:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Mental health services in rural and Indigenous communities face unique challenges and require special considerations to provide high quality care. One of the biggest challenges to the availability of services are shortages in the workforce. In this session, we will discuss strategies to recruit and retain providers in these areas, and how access and availability can be increased by integrating behavioral health and primary care. We will also discuss improving access to mental health services for people living in Indigenous communities, informed by culturally humble practices.

Presenters

Robert Osterman Cotes, M.D. (Moderator)

Robert O. Cotes, MD, is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is Director of the Grady Clinical and Research Program for Psychosis, which comprises of three clinical programs: 1) PSTAR Clinic (Persistent Symptoms: Treatment, Assessment and Recovery) which focuses on clozapine, 2) Project ARROW (an early psychosis program) and 3) Open Dialogue Atlanta. He serves as a Psychiatrist Expert for the American Psychiatric Association’s SMI Adviser initiative.

Mary Hasbah Roessel, M.D.

Mary Hasbah Roessel is a Navajo (Diné) psychiatrist and distinguished fellow of the APA practicing in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She received her medical degree at the University of Minnesota and returned to the southwest to complete her residency in psychiatry at the University of New Mexico. She received an APA/ NIMH Fellowship during her residency and has since worked for over twenty-five years with Indigenous peoples of the southwest, Alaska, and British Columbia. She has a special expertise in cultural psychiatry.

Marisa A. Giggie, M.D.

Dr. Marisa A. Giggie is Vice Chair and Associate Professor at The University of Alabama. She graduated from Smith College and The LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her M.D. from MCP/Pennsylvania/Hahnemann School of Medicine. She completed a residency in psychiatry, fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry and in forensics from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio. Her research interests include rural health, addiction, and correctional psychiatry.

Lori E. Raney, M.D.

Dr. Lori Raney is a board-certified psychiatrist and Principal with Health Management Associates in Denver, Colorado. She is considered a leading authority on the collaborative care model and the bidirectional integration of primary care and behavioral health. Her work focuses on service evaluation, gap analysis and design and training of multidisciplinary teams to implement evidence-based practices to improve the identification and treatment of mental illness in the primary care setting and improve the health status of patients with serious mental illness behavioral health settings.

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Deep Dive A
Increasing Access to Intensive Community Supports in Rural Areas

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

The Mississippi Department of Mental Health developed Intensive Community Outreach and Recovery (ICORT) Teams to address the workforce challenges associated with complying with Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) standards in rural regions while providing comprehensive services for individuals with SMI. ICORT has fewer staffing requirements and higher staff-to-client ratios than ACT and its own fidelity scale to ensure desired outcomes. Join us to talk about how to tailor evidence-based services for delivery in under-resourced and rural communities.

Challenge Questions

  • How can you identify the appropriate staff to provide intensive services in rural areas and in homes?
  • How can you partner with providers to identify what teams and services would be most beneficial in your area?

Facilitators

Wendy D. Bailey, M.A.

Wendy Bailey is the Executive Director of the Mississippi Department of Mental Health, a role she assumed in January 2021. She has been with the agency for 16 years, beginning her career at Mississippi State Hospitals. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and is a Licensed Mental Health Administrator. She serves on numerous boards and task forces including the Governor’s School Safety Task Force, Southeast Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Advisory Board, Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services Board, State Early Childhood Advisory Council, and the Mississippi’s Suicide Prevention Task Force.

Jake Hutchins, M.S.

Jake Hutchins is the Deputy Executive Director of Community Operations for the Mississippi Department of Mental Health. He has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in social work, along with an extensive background in community mental health services. He has been with the department since 2002. Prior to being named Deputy Executive Director in January 2021, he was Bureau Director for Behavioral Health Services. In that role, he oversaw the expansion of community mental health services for both adults and children, including Mobile Crisis Response Teams, intensive community services like Programs of Assertive Community Treatment, Intensive Community Outreach and Recovery Teams, and more.

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Deep Dive B
How to Ask Kids and Families the Hard Questions: Having an Impact on Youth

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

This deep dive will demonstrate and examine the difficulties in talking to families and youth about racism and other sticky issues. The APA Council on Children, Adolescents, and Their Families developed protocols for physicians to use to make these difficult questions easier. Discussion of difference between live and video experiences with these issues will be examined during this deep dive. After attending this deep dive, participants will be more comfortable and familiar with asking difficult questions related to social determinants of mental health with patients and families.

Challenge Questions

  • What are some difficult conversations you have had with a young patient, and why were they challenging?
  • How might virtual technologies make discussing sticky issues easier or more difficult?

Facilitators

Gabrielle Shapiro, M.D.

Dr. Shapiro is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Collaborative Care Program Director at The Boriken/East Harlem Health Council, and Supervising Psychiatrist at Union Settlement. She is a Delegate for AACAP and the the Medical Society of the State of New York (MSSNY). She is a Board Member of the APA Foundation, AACAP-PAC, NYCCAP, New York County Psychiatric Society (NYCPS), and the New York County Medical Society (NYCMS). Dr. Shapiro is Chair of the APA Council on Children, Adolescents and their Families and an editor of textbooks.

Stephanie Garayalde, M.D.

Stephanie Garayalde, M.D., completed her APA/APAF Child and Adolescent Fellowship in June 2021. She is a Corresponding Member of the Council on Children, Adolescents, and their Families. She completed her first three years of adult psychiatry residency at the University of Florida in Gainesville. She then relocated to Jacksonville for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship. Aside from psychiatry, Stephanie enjoys playing badminton, spending time with her cat, dog, and partner, reading for book club, and expanding her knowledge in French.

Mandar Jadhav, M.D.

Dr. Jadhav is currently an APA Jeanne Spurlock Congressional Fellow assigned to a U.S. Senator’s office, where he is learning about the interplay between policy and psychiatry. Dr. Jadhav also serves on the Extended Executive Committee of the Indo-American Psychiatric Association, and on the Board of Directors of the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry. He completed child & adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Johns Hopkins, where he was a chief fellow. His residency training was at Penn State. His professional interests include medical education, and school-based & collaborative care.

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Deep Dive C
Tackling Sociopolitical Determinants Through Scholarship

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Optimizing the health of our communities requires proactive and strategic planning and policy around the social determinants of health. Relevant and actionable scholarly research and publication is a critical component of this challenge. This is easier said than done! We need models and examples. This discussion will highlight several research studies recently featured in the journal Psychiatric Services and elsewhere as well as several steps the journal has made to increase its effectiveness in meeting this challenge.

Challenge Questions

  • Is research inherently biased against addressing and correcting the sociopolitical determinants of health?

Facilitator

Lisa B. Dixon, M.D., M.P.H.

Lisa Dixon, M.D., M.P.H., is the Edna L Edison Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. She conducts health services research and oversees activities for the NYS Office of Mental Health in implementing evidenced based practices for persons diagnosed with serious mental illness. Dr. Dixon's work has joined individuals engaged in self-help, outpatient psychiatric care, as well as clinicians and policy makers in collaborative research endeavors. Dr. Dixon has been editor of the journal, Psychiatric Services since 2017.

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Deep Dive D
Roadmap to the Ideal Behavioral Health Crisis System

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:00 - 2:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Federal legislation establishing a 988 crisis number creates impetus for communities to develop a continuum of behavioral health crisis services. The Group for Advancement of Psychiatry issued a report (published by National Council): Roadmap to an Ideal Crisis System, Essential Elements, Measurable Standards, and Best Practices, to guide communities on making progress, including a self assessment report card. This session engages participants to envision an ideal crisis system, and help make progress in their own communities, so that every person gets the right response in the right place every time.

Challenge Questions

  • Is it appropriate to consider behavioral health crisis systems as an essential community safety net service, just like fire, police, and EMS?What are the best next steps that you can do in your community to help establish the vision and make progress?
  • What are the best next steps that you can do in your community to help establish the vision and make progress?

Facilitators

Jacqueline Feldman, M.D.

Jacqueline Feldman, M.D., is Professor Emerita, UAB Dept of Psychiatry, and NAMI Associate Medical Director. She served as a federal court monitor for women’s mental health in the Alabama DOC, and the DOJ in its investigation of GA State Hospitals. She is Past President of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists and served on the APF Board. She is Chair of the 2019 APA AM Scientific Program Committee. Dr. Feldman has published and spoken extensively on schizophrenia, dual diagnosis, public policy development, the importance of advocacy, mental health and criminal justice, and recovery. She is Editor-in-Chief of the Community Mental Health Journal.

Kenneth Minkoff, M.D.

Kenneth Minkoff, M.D., is a board-certified psychiatrist with a certificate of additional qualifications in addiction psychiatry; a dedicated community psychiatrist, and currently is a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Margie Balfour, M.D.

Margie Balfour, M.D., Ph.D., is a psychiatrist and national leader in crisis care, quality improvement, and law enforcement responses to behavioral health emergencies. She is Chief of Quality & Clinical Innovation at Connections Health Solutions and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Arizona. Dr. Balfour was named Doctor of the Year by the National Council for Behavioral Health for her work at the Crisis Response Center in Tucson and CIT International Practitioner of the Year for her efforts to help law enforcement better serve people with behavioral health needs.

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Breakout A
Climate Change as a Sociopolitical Determinant of Mental Health

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:30 - 4:00 p.m. EDT

Description

With the growing numbers and severity of hurricanes, fires, and record-breaking temperatures, climate change has shifted from a future concern to a present reality. Climate change can adversely impact the mental health of our patients and the general population. In this session, a panel of leading experts will present case examples illustrating the different pathways by which climate change is linked to mental health. They will discuss the social and political factors underlying the link between climate change and mental health outcomes. Participants will learn strategies for addressing these challenges both as clinicians and advocates.

Presenters

Benjamin G. Druss, M.D. (Moderator)

Benjamin Druss, M.D., as the first Rosalynn Carter Chair in Mental Health at Emory University, is working to build linkages between mental health, physical health, and public health. At Emory, he works closely with the Carter Center Mental Program, where he is a member of the Mental Health Taskforce and Journalism Advisory Board. Dr. Druss serves on the editorial boards of JAMA Psychiatry, the American Journal of Psychiatry, and General Hospital Psychiatry and edits Psychiatric Services’ Integrated Care Column. He is a member of NIMH’s National Advisory Mental Health Council.

David Pollack, M.D.

David Pollack, M.D., is Professor Emeritus for Public Policy in the department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University. His activities include teaching, writing, and consulting on policy, systems, and health care leadership issues. Since retiring, he has exclusively focused on addressing the mental health and public health impacts of the climate crisis. He is a founding member of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance and has been pivotal in many of the climate related policy and educational initiatives conducted through the APA, OHSU, and other health related organizations.

Elizabeth Haase, M.D.

Dr. Haase is Medical Director of Psychiatry at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno, Nevada. She serves in several leadership roles on climate mental health, including Chair of the APA Committee on Climate and Mental Health and GAP Committee on Climate and Mental Health and Steering Committee for the non-profit Climate Psychiatry Alliance.

Felix Torres, M.D., M.B.A. (Discussant)

Felix Torres, MD, MBA, DFAPA is the Chief of Forensic Medicine at the Texas Health and Human Services Commission’s Health and Specialty Care System’s State Hospital System. He is the Minority/Underrepresented Representative Trustee to the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Board of Trustees and the Co-Chair of the APA Board of Trustees Structural Racism Accountability Committee. Dr. Torres is a Special Advisor to the American Psychiatric Association on the United Nations.

Robin Cooper, M.D.

Dr. Robin Cooper is a San Francisco psychiatrist who has had a private practice for nearly 40 years and is Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Dept of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the University of California San Francisco where she has worn many different hats over her career both as educator and supervisor with psychiatric residents and medical students. She is to co-founder and President of Climate Psychiatry Alliance, a group dedicated to understanding, education and advocacy about the specific impact of climate change on mental health. In addition, she is active member of a number of organizations addressing the interface of climate and health both at the University of California San Francisco medical center, locally in her community and nationally.

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Breakout B
Serving and Working with Patients Involved in the Criminal Justice System

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  2:30 - 4:00 p.m. EDT

Description

Considerations of how to work with police and with patients and clients who have been previously involved in the criminal justice system to avoid stigma and rejoin society. This session will explore how to utilize current systems and the systemic reforms that will be needed to effectively treat patients within the criminal justice system.

Presenters

Sarah Y. Vinson, M.D. (Moderator)

Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, GA based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Vinson is also the founder of Lorio Forensics, which provide consultation in a wide variety of cases in criminal, civil and family court cases.

Debra A. Pinals, M.D.

Debra A. Pinals, M.D., is the Director of the Program in Psychiatry, Law, & Ethics and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan Medical School and Clinical Adjunct Professor at the University of Michigan Law School. She also serves as the Medical Director of Behavioral Health and Forensic Programs for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Pinals was appointed as the Assistant Commissioner of Forensic Services from 2008 to 2016 and the Interim State Medical Director from 2012-2013 for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.

Sonya Shadravan, M.D.

Dr. Sonya M. Shadravan is a psychiatrist in Los Angeles, California and is affiliated with Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA. She received her medical degree from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and has been in practice for less than three years.

Micah Pearson, C.P.S.W.

Micah Pearson is the Secretary to the Executive Committee of the NAMI Board of Directors and is the Executive Director of NAMI Southern New Mexico. After experiencing multiple hospitalizations and the all-too-common de facto hospital that is the criminal justice system, he dedicated himself to reforming a system that seemed tailored to criminalize those with mental health conditions. Since then, he published "A Peek Inside: Illustrated Journeys in Life With Mental Illness" and was recognized with a New Mexico Behavioral Health Star Award for his work in Criminal Justice Reform and Peer Support.

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Deep Dive A
The Self-Assessment for Modification of Anti-Racism Tool (SMART): An Introduction

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

In 2020, a national dialogue on systemic racism was reinvigorated by the highly publicized deaths of several unarmed Black Americans, including George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. In response, the AACP Board considered how to promote concrete, meaningful action to support its membership in measurably addressing structures and policies that promote racism. The AACP recognized a unique opportunity to model improvement with regards to antiracism efforts both within organizations and also within the services that we represent. The SMART Tool was a key output of these discussions. The AACP SMART Tool is a quality improvement tool that aims to facilitate organizational change in community behavioral healthcare. It incorporates domains specific to structural racism and disparities issues in community behavioral healthcare. SMART provides a roadmap for community behavioral health providers that facilitates continuous quality improvement in combating structural racism by (1) providing metrics specific to disparity and inequity issues in community behavioral health, (2) extending beyond culture competency and linguistic appropriateness to incorporate structural inequity, and (3) promoting a stepwise, concrete quality improvement process that could be adapted for self-directed use in community behavioral health settings.

Challenge Questions

  • How does your organization initiate, facilitate and sustain conversations around structural racism in a productive way?
  • How could the SMART Tool facilitate continuous, self-directed anti-racism activity within your organization?

Facilitators

Sosunmolu Shoyinka, M.D.

Dr. Sosunmolu Shoyinka serves as Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS). Prior to this he served as Medical Director for Home State and Sunflower Health Plans and as Director of the Missouri Behavioral Pharmacy Management program. He is Triple Board certified and holds an MBA from Kelley Business School. Dr. Shoyinka teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, serves on the Board of the American Association for Community Psychiatry and has been recognized as a Black leader shaping the future of Psychiatry.

Rachel Talley, M.D.

Rachel Talley, M.D. is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Fellowship in Community Psychiatry. She works clinically in community psychiatry as a staff attending at Horizon House, Inc. Dr. Talley received her B.A. from Harvard University and her M.D. from Stanford University. She completed both her adult residency training and public psychiatry fellowship at Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is an Early Career Board Representative for the American Association for Community Psychiatry.

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Deep Dive B
Crisis Services and Criminal Justice

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

The issue of law enforcement’s role in responding to crises involving persons with serious mental illness is a challenging one. In addition, people living with mental illness are disproportionately involved in the criminal justice system, turning prisons into ostensible mental health treatment centers, a function for which correctional facilities were never designed. In this deep dive, participants will discuss the complicated issues at the crux of criminal justice and mental health, with the goal of exploring creative ideas for improving the welfare of patients involved in the criminal justice system.

Challenge Questions

  • What is the ideal role for mental health professionals in influencing the criminal justice system's interactions with people living with mental illness?
  • How might the current practice of mental health, correctional mental health, and forensic mental health be leveraged to better serve patients with criminal justice system involvement?

Facilitator

Sarah Vinson, M.D.

Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, Ga. based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Vinson is also the founder of Lorio Forensics, which provide consultation in a wide variety of cases in criminal, civil and family court cases.

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Deep Dive C
What Does the Radical Change of Climate Change Mean for American Psychiatry?

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

Climate change is moving fast. Compound disasters and civic conflicts fueled in part by climate changes are piling up at the front door while out the back door oceans, soils and species are on the verge of collapse.

Challenge Questions

  • What should American Psychiatry do in response to climate change?
  • What new kinds of care need to be delivered?
  • What skills help patients change quickly?
  • What must be relinquished in our current models of care? What preserved?

Facilitators

Elizabeth Haase, M.D.

Dr. Haase is Medical Director of Psychiatry at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno, Nevada. She serves in several leadership roles on climate mental health, including Chair of the APA Committee on Climate and Mental Health and GAP Committee on Climate and Mental Health and Steering Committee for the non-profit Climate Psychiatry Alliance.

Felix Torres, M.D.

Felix Torres, M.D., M.B.A., DFAPA is the Chief of Forensic Medicine at the Texas Health and Human Services Commission’s Health and Specialty Care System’s State Hospital System. He is the Minority/Underrepresented Representative Trustee to the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Board of Trustees and the Co-Chair of the APA Board of Trustees Structural Racism Accountability Committee. Dr. Torres is a Special Advisor to the American Psychiatric Association on the United Nations.

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Deep Dive D
The Entire Community as the Patient: Addressing Structural and Environmental Issues Directly at a Community Level

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:00 - 4:30 p.m. EDT

About Deep Dive Sessions

Deep dive sessions connect attendees with each other in a live virtual environment, providing an opportunity to network and problem-solve with their peers to continue the conversation from the breakout sessions. Sessions are led by a subject matter expert and allow attendees a chance to ask questions, share ideas, and take away creative solutions to complex problems. Each deep dive session block includes four concurrent sessions on different topics. To ensure lively discussion, attendance at deep dive sessions, while included in conference registration, is limited. Deep dive sessions do not provide CME credit.

Description

As we explore the impact of social determinants of health on individuals, how do these same factors influence communities of people? In this deep dive we will explore how to form and address groups of people together who experience the same or similar social determinants of health. Might there be processes and advantages of communal modes of healing? What effective ways are communities using to address common structural determinants of racism, trauma, violence or environment? How might we directly work with community as our patient?

Challenge Questions

  • What effective ways are groups of people or communities using to address common structural determinants of racism, trauma, violence or environment?
  • Might there be defined processes and advantages of communal modes of healing?

Facilitators

Peter Chien, M.D.

Dr. Peter Chien, M.D., M.A. is a psychiatrist at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. He is the Medical Director and Co-founder of the Acute Recovery Center which provides acute, outpatient care to veterans in crisis and was named a 2020 VA Shark Tank Innovation Finalist. Awarded the 2019 Excellence in Patient Care Award by the Illinois Psychiatric Society, he is also an Associate Professor at Loyola University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, the Treasurer and Membership Chair of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists, and a member of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance. Formerly a Public Psychiatry Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, he strongly believes in preventive and population approaches to mental health.

Mira Bodic, M.D.

Dr. Mira Bodic completed her medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest, Romania, and her residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. She is an alum of the Public Psychiatry Fellowship at Columbia University, where she is currently on faculty. She specializes in Emergency Psychiatry, with a particular focus of bringing recovery-oriented care and a trauma informed approach to acute care settings. She is using her interest in teaching and adult learning, and the interface between healthcare and technology, in her role at Maimonides Medical Center Residency Training Program. Mira is currently the president for the Brooklyn Psychiatric Society and an active member of the American Association of Community Psychiatry.

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Breakout A
Structural Trauma Exacted by the Mental Health System

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:30 - 6:00 p.m. EDT

Description

There is systemic trauma inherent in the mental healthcare system, which adversely affects both patients and providers. Policy and systems need to be updated to address social hierarchies, inequities, implicit bias and racism in order to avoid the structural traumatization of patients and families.

Presenters

Sarah Y. Vinson, M.D. (Moderator)

Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, GA based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Vinson is also the founder of Lorio Forensics, which provide consultation in a wide variety of cases in criminal, civil and family court cases.

Stephanie Keeney Parks, Ph.D., M.A.

Stephanie is a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles in the Department of Anthropology. She also possesses a master’s degree in Medical Anthropology from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Health Policy Research Scholar. Stephanie’s research centers on the everyday lives of Black parents who have children with autism. Her research stems from her experiences as a Black woman, wife, and mother of two children. Stephanie’s oldest child is diagnosed with autism.

Kupiri W. Ackerman-Barger, Ph.D., R.N.

Piri Ackerman-Barger is associate dean for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and a clinical professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis. She is also the director of Faculty Development for Education and Teaching and co-director for the Interprofessional Teaching Scholars Program.

Polly McKinney

Polly has been advocacy director at Voices for Georgia’s Children since 2010. Additionally, she owns a strategic communications company, Long Game Strategies, LLC, allowing her to enhance and continue her work at Voices, while creating content for clients and causes akin to child policy. She serves on the Georgia School Based Health Alliance Board, is a member of the National Juvenile Justice Network and is past Chair of the ChildKind Board of Directors. Polly also serves on the Juvenile Justice State Advisory Board, an appointment made by Governor Nathan Deal. She is a member of the Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative state steering committee.

Prior to her work in child policy, Polly was responsible for developing communications for Southern States Energy Board, served as Executive Director of the League of Women Voters of Georgia and spent more than two decades in various production capacities in the Georgia film industry, which included two regional Emmy nominations and the writing and production of the introductory film at the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site. She was a member of the first class of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics and earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has two astounding kids, Skye and Zane.

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Breakout B
Community Leadership and Frontline Care

  •  Friday, October 15
  •  4:30 - 6:00 p.m. EDT

Description

How do coalitions between different disciplines work together to effectively advance patient care and address social determinants of care? Given the prevalence of intersectionality within social determinants, leaders in multiple disciplines, not just psychiatry, engaged in frontline care must work together more effectively than in the past.

Presenters

Jacqueline Maus Feldman, M.D. (Moderator)

Jacqueline Feldman, M.D., is Professor Emerita, UAB Dept of Psychiatry, and NAMI Associate Medical Director. She served as a federal court monitor for women’s mental health in the Alabama DOC, and the DOJ in its investigation of GA State Hospitals. She is Past President of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists and served on the APF Board. She is Chair of the 2019 APA AM Scientific Program Committee. Dr. Feldman has published and spoken extensively on schizophrenia, dual diagnosis, public policy development, the importance of advocacy, mental health and criminal justice, and recovery. She is Editor-in-Chief of the Community Mental Health Journal.

Rochelle Head-Dunham, M.D.

Rochelle Head-Dunham, MD, DFAPA, FASAM is an Addiction Psychiatrist who currently serves as Executive and Medical Director for Metropolitan Human Services District. Dr. Head-Dunham is Assistant and Associate Professor at Tulane and LSU respectively, and was formerly, LA-OBH Assistant Secretary, State Commissioner for MH and SSA Director for Addictive Disorders. Named a “Physician Champion” for the state of Louisiana, she is a thought leader and strategist on systems level change. Her visionary impact to our communities is progressive, transformative, and health justice informed.

Kenneth Thompson, M.D.

Kenneth S. Thompson, MD, lives in Pittsburgh. He graduated from Kenyon College and Boston University School of Medicine, where he was a National Health Service Corps Scholar. He was a resident in psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a postdoc in mental health services research at Yale. He has been faculty at Yale and the University of Pittsburgh. He was the Director for Medical Affairs at the Center for Mental Health Services in SAMHSA. He is the Chief Medical Officer of the Pennsylvania Psychiatric Leadership Council, a policy and advocacy organization.

Amir Ahuja, M.D.

Dr. Amir Ahuja is the Director of Psychiatry at the Los Angeles LGBT Center. He is also President of the APA-Allied Group AGLP: The Association of LGBTQ Psychiatrists. He has a private practice in Beverly Hills, California and Little Silver, New Jersey. His book about LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence will be out in late 2021/early 2022

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