APA Blog

Category : Alzheimer’s

African Americans Face a Greater Risk of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia and it affects about one-third of adults age 85 and older in the U.S., but some populations are disproportionally impacted. For instance, African Americans are about twice as likely as whites to have Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

Taking Care of the Caregivers

More than 17 million individuals in the United States are family caregivers, providing care and support to an older adult because of physical, mental or cognitive challenges. Many of them care for a parent, a spouse or a friend with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.

Cardiovascular Health and Brain Heath: Lifelong Connection

Two studies published in August in JAMA highlight and clarify the connection between heart health and brain health, especially the risk of dementia. They add to the evidence supporting promotion of cardiovascular health in adults of all ages to help lower the risk of dementia and cognitive decline and provide more support for adopting a healthy lifestyle.

Positive Beliefs about Aging May Help Lower Risk of Dementia

Facing the challenges of aging, including the potential for declines in memory and thinking skills, can be difficult for many people, especially in a society that often doesn’t value age. But having positive beliefs about aging can lower a person’s risk of dementia, according to a new study.

Researchers Identifying New Ways to Detect Alzheimer’s

As many as half of people with Alzheimer's and other dementias have not been diagnosed, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.