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Get Help With Dissociative Disorders

Curated and updated for the community by APA

Dissociative disorders involve problems with memory, identity, emotion, perception, behavior and sense of self. Dissociative symptoms can potentially disrupt every area of mental functioning.

Examples of dissociative symptoms include the experience of detachment or feeling as if one is outside one’s body, and loss of memory or amnesia. Dissociative disorders are frequently associated with previous experience of trauma.

See definition, symptoms, & treatment

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Can people actually have “multiple personalities” or a “split personality”?

Dissociative identity disorder involves a lack of connection among a person’s sense of identity, memory and consciousness. People with this disorder do not have more than one personality but rather less than one personality. (The name was changed recently from ‘multiple personality disorder’ to ‘dissociative identity disorder.’) This disorder usually arises in response to physical and sexual abuse in childhood as a means of surviving mistreatment by people who should be nurturing and protecting. Read More

Are people with dissociative identity disorder often misdiagnosed?

Yes. They are sometimes misdiagnosed as having schizophrenia, because their belief that they have different identities could be interpreted as a delusion. They sometimes experience dissociated identities as auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Their symptoms do not improve with antipsychotic medication, but the emotions they display get flatter. This can leading to the mistaken belief that they have schizophrenia and to further ineffective increases in medication. Another common misdiagnosis is borderline personality disorder. People with dissociative identity disorder frequently also have depression. Read More

What symptoms would family members see in a person had dissociative identity disorder? Can friends/family members tell when a person with dissociative identity disorder “switches”?

You may notice sudden changes in mood and behavior. People with dissociative identity disorder may forget or deny saying or doing things that family members witnessed. Family members can usually tell when a person “switches.” The transitions can be sudden and startling. The person may go from being fearful, dependent and excessively apologetic to being angry and domineering. He or she may report not remembering something they said just minutes earlier. Read More

Once a person is being treated for a dissociative disorder, how can family members best support and help him/her?

Be open and accepting in your responses. Do not ‘take sides’ with one or another component of their identity. Rather view them as portions of the person as a whole. We are all different in different situations, but we see this as different sides of ourselves. Try to maintain that perspective with the person with dissociative disorder. Also, help them to protect themselves from any trauma or abuse. Read More

spiegel-expert

About the Expert:

Dr. David Spiegel
Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Director, Center on Stress and Health
Medical Director, Center for Integrative Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine

Sandra's Story

35-yo-Male.jpg

Sandra was a 25-year-old soldier hospitalized for sudden changes in behavior and episodes of apparently poor memory. She was confused about her recent history, and believed that she was in a different hospital located 800 miles from the place where she had in fact been admitted. The diagnoses initially considered included schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder and substance abuse. She was started on neuroleptics (tranquilizers) with little benefit. Read More

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FEB 16, 2017

Dissociative identity disorder is nothing like how it's portrayed in 'Split,' according to people who have it

Business Insider

Having a "split personality" is called dissociative identity disorder. Split personalities are known as "alters," while the body is the "host" or "system." DID has been wrongly portrayed in film, TV, and books as linked with evil. In most cases, people with DID are the victims of abuse, not the abusers. They want you to know they are not "monsters" but are human just like you.

FEB 15, 2017

Understanding the fragmented world of multiple personality disorder

Lohud: The Journal News

Anyone who has seen the classic movies “The Three Faces of Eve,” “Sybil,” or most recently, M. Night Shyamalan’s movie “Split,” knows that they focus on people afflicted with multiple personality disorder (now known as dissociative identity disorder). Nikhil Palekar, MD, Unit Chief of the Second Chance Program at New York-Presbyterian Hospital explains, “dissociative identity disorder is a severe condition in which a person’s identity is fragmented into two or more distinct identities.

FEB 3, 2017

The Reality Behind ‘Split’: Is Multiple Personality Disorder A Myth Perpetuated By Movies?

Movie Pilot

As occurs whenever a new movie is made about it, dissociative identity disorder has come to the forefront of the public's mind again thanks to M. Night Shyamalan's controversial movie #Split, which seems to stigmatize DID (and demonize those who struggle with mental health conditions) as its main antagonist juggles multiple personalities. But how much of dissociative identity disorder is fact, and how much is fiction?